What do the symbols on the tarot cards mean?

Question by Matthew: What do the symbols on the tarot cards mean?
What do the clubs, stars, swords, and cups mean?

Best answer:

Answer by Mew
http://www.paranormality.com/tarot_meanings.shtml

my nan can read them & taught me to do readings
Load of crap if you ask me, but when I do the idiots can really relate to it

Add your own answer in the comments!

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9 Responses to What do the symbols on the tarot cards mean?

  1. Will Nickel July 2, 2013 at 2:07 am #

    There are a good many different explanations, any one of which will suffice. As an earlier answer told you, each pack of cards comes with an explanatory booklet.

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  2. jysn_kay July 2, 2013 at 2:53 am #

    SATAN

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  3. Mars July 2, 2013 at 3:36 am #

    Actually it’s cups, swords, batons and coins and the meanings originate from French culture in the Middle Ages

    Cups represent the Clergy (First Estate)
    Swords represent the Nobility (Second Estate)
    Batons represent the Farmers (Third Estate [Rural])
    Coins represent the Merchants (Third Estate [Urban])

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  4. summer July 2, 2013 at 4:27 am #

    i have no idea

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  5. macadam July 2, 2013 at 5:02 am #

    The answer would be too long to put here. I suggest you check out : http://www.aeclectic.net/tarot/

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  6. Falling Angle BrokenEye July 2, 2013 at 5:58 am #

    They don’t mean anything, just like the symbols on the regular playing cards don’t mean anything. People occasionally assign them arbitrary meanings, however.

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  7. Graybeard July 2, 2013 at 6:40 am #

    Nothing at all. Tarot is a 400 yr. old very complicated French card game rather like contract bridge. The colorful cards were later adopted by gypsies and other charlatans who pretended to predict the future from magical meanings. No truth to it at all.

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  8. IntuitiveImpressions July 2, 2013 at 7:10 am #

    A standard tarot deck has pentacles (clubs) meaning the earth element or those things having to do with finances; the wands (stars???) which are elements of fire and other things, like communication coming in; the swords, which deal with air and thoughts and thinking elements; and finally, the cups which are the water element and deal with emotions and love.

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  9. philebus July 2, 2013 at 7:33 am #

    Well, there are different ways to answer this one. We can start by looking that the answer history offers.

    Playing cards are believed to have developed from Chinese money games, which may even have been played with actual currency. We do know that these games featured suits, such as coins, and stacks of coins, which may have developed into what we now call the round (cups and coins) and long (swords and batons) suits.

    We first see playing cards in the form recognisable to us in the Islamic world, which came into Europe via trade with North Africa in the 14th century. These had the familiar 52 structure but featured the suits of Cups, Coins, Scimitars (curved swords), and Polo Sticks. The game of Polo was not played in Europe at that time, so the sticks lost their paddle and become just batons. It is worth noting that at this time, the court cards were all male and in Europe were a King, a Rider, and a Footman. Cards like these are still the standard form of playing card in countries such as Italy and Spain, as well as in parts of South America.

    It was in the mid 15th century that an extra suit of picture cards, along with queens, were added to these cards for the Milanese court to give us the Tarot pack. And for nearly 350 years they were used only for playing card games.

    Towards the end of the 18th century, French occultists began to adopt the cards, promoting them as occult objects and fitting them into detailed occult systems. This is when the Coins were changed into Pentacles (five pointed stars), and the batons often referred to as Wands. However the changes were not adopted by all occultists.

    As the suits were not actually created for occult interpretation but adopted for it, they can mean whatever fits your needs or beliefs and you can find many different accounts in books – but there is no right answer, only the answer that suits you.

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